Electric Raspberry

MESSAGE // ABOUT ME // PERSONAL POSTS // BLOGSPOT // PINTEREST // THEME //

  • Anonymous

    I’m so sorry you’ve been feeling insecure. Insecurity is something society too often views as sort of a cliche write-off, but in truth it can be completely debilitating. I have a couple of tips, and they may sound silly, but I genuinely believe they may be able to help! :] It may seem obvious, but it’s important to maintain good hygiene and to dress in clean clothes that you feel comfortable in. When you’re feeling poorly about yourself, it’s very easy to hide out at home, skip a couple showers, and wear the same faded out summer camp t-shirt for 4 days straight. This behavior only perpetuates your negative self-image. Glancing at yourself in the mirror with a giant Top Ramen stain on your sweat pants isn’t going to do anything for your self confidence. Next, make a conscious effort to stay clear of negativity. Any friends who are a touch over-critical—keep your distance from them right now. Surround yourself with positive, trustworthy friends. Lastly, own your personality. Own your likes, your dislikes, your skills, and your morals. Take note of the things you’re good at! Maybe you aren’t a brilliant mathematician, but you make a killer grilled cheese sandwich and you always make your friends laugh. Celebrate even your smallest accomplishments and skills. These are the facets of who you are! Remember that everyone has negative attributes. There is no such thing as perfection. People look pretty carefree and happy when they post a photo on instagram or write a blog post about their day-trip to the beach. No one is eager to share their self-doubt, fears, failures, etc. It’s important to be a friend to yourself. Hold your own hand, pick yourself up, and really look at all of the goodness inside of you. Things could always be much worse, and it’s crucial to appreciate all that you have. Everyone feels insecure at one time or another. You’ll move past this, just take the first few steps in caring for yourself, inside and out. :]


  • Anonymous

    Ah! Thank you so much! That’s tremendously flattering. My hair is so long right now, I’ll likely let it grow a while longer before chopping it off. But I do know that somewhere down the line I really really would like to give short hair a try! I would love a cut that’s a little more low maintenance. :]


  • Anonymous

    It’s all a matter of location/circumstance. Striking up a conversation with someone in a coffee shop is very different than approaching someone walking down the street. There have been times when I have been very bold. I remember once, I was eating at a diner and I asked my waitress to slip a note to a guy sitting at the opposite end of the counter. I’d told him he was cute and wrote it in lipstick on a napkin. One time a boy shouted his phone number to me from his car window. I like a bold approach. The best way to test the waters is to try and make brief eye contact, and then smile. If the person you’re aiming for smiles back or takes a second look, then just go for it and say hi. Honestly, I think you could even say something along the lines of what you’ve written above: “Hi. I just needed to tell you, you’re absolutely gorgeous. Genuinely.” I actually said that to a girl working at an ice cream shop a couple weeks ago. She was ridiculously cute but so sweet and so understated. Before I left I made sure to tell her how stunning she was. She was then beaming and told me that I’d made her day. Go for it and pay someone a compliment, whether or not they return the gesture. You’ll brighten someone’s day a little by doing so, and the more outgoing you are, the more confident you’ll feel about approaching someone you don’t know, each and every time you choose to do it! :]


  • roxycieniawska

    Depends on the person! On myself, I prefer the look of long hair, but I fantasize about short hair on a daily basis. I’m too chicken to chop it off just yet—not sure I have the face for it.


  • Anonymous

    Hi there! I think standards of closeness and attachment vary for each individual, and for every couple. There is no correct or incorrect way to involve yourself with another person, as long as neither party feels uncomfortable, stifled, etc. I think it best you sit down with your boyfriend and discuss your expectations regarding contact while you’re apart. He won’t know what you’re looking for unless you take the first step and vocalize it with him. :] Additionally, you should hear his thoughts as well, and allow him to explain what makes him feel comfortable. This push/pull dynamic and discussion is what solid, healthy relationships are built on. Remember though, that trust is key. If you trust your boyfriend (and you should, because otherwise you should not be committed to someone you do not trust), then have confidence in his honesty and his loyalty, and maybe ease up a little when he isn’t physically with you. :]


8563